Blog - SaniPath
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The SaniPath Exposure Assessment Tool: An Integrated Project Management, Data Analysis, and Visualization Platform

S. Raj, Y. Wang, A. White, N. Kishore, C. Siesel


UNC Water and Health Conference (October 2018)

Suraja Raj presented a poster at the UNC Water and Health Conference in October, 2018, highlighting new developments related to the new SaniPath Tool. The SaniPath Tool examines human exposure to fecal contamination in low-resource urban settings. It provides guidance for primary data collection, automated exposure analysis, and results visualizations that are accessible to people from a range of scientific backgrounds. This poster describes the development of a tool that allows users to plan a SaniPath deployment, set up and manage mobile data collection, analyze results, and generate reports. The tool guides users through steps of implementing the tool–from planning to data analysis. The tool is composed of a project planning and management interface, mobile data collection and data repository, and a data analysis and visualization dashboard. The tool can be customized to suit context-specific data collection needs. The SaniPath Tool is built on an integrated system of existing open source technologies and a tailored project management interface. It guides users through project configuration, training, and deployment by automating the customization and analysis processes. The Tool also uses an open source mobile data collection software, KoboToolbox (KT), which provides the backbone of data collection and storage. Data is collected via downloadable mobile forms used on Android devices and is uploaded to KT, which is paired with Enketo for online web data entry or editing. The tool automatically retrieves data from KT and generates exposure assessments for each study site and exposure pathway. Users can view and analyze the collected data, access data visualizations, and create a draft final report. The services are deployed on Amazon Web Services (AWS) infrastructure and backups are stored in S3 buckets for redundant data storage. The SaniPath Tool is an innovative use of mHealth in the WASH sector and can serve as an example of how open source software can be used to synthesize and analyze complex information and encourage public health evidence-based decision-making about urban sanitation investment.


Access Poster Here

SaniPath Project Launch: Accra, Ghana

In partnership with Training, Research and Networking for Development (TREND) Group, the SaniPath Project was launched in Accra, Ghana in August ’18. This project involves TREND conducting training of Accra Metropolitan Assembly (AMA) members and performing project management activities for a deployment in select neighborhoods in Accra. AMA will be conducting the fieldwork and collaborating with the Water Research Institute of the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research to perform laboratory analyses. These activities are part of the establishment of TREND as a SaniPath Training Hub for the West-African region. Below is a news segment about the SaniPath Accra project filmed during the launch event.

 

SaniPath Project Launch: Kumasi, Ghana

In partnership with Training, Research and Networking for Development (TREND) Group, the SaniPath Project was launched in Kumasi, Ghana in July ’18. This project involves TREND conducting training of Kumasi Metropolitan Assembly (KMA) members and performing project management activities for a deployment in 4 neighborhoods throughout Kumasi. KMA will be conducting the fieldwork and collaborating with Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST) to perform laboratory analyses. These activities are part of the establishment of TREND as a SaniPath Training Hub for the West-African region. Below is a news segment about the SaniPath Kumasi project filmed during the launch event.

 

 

Children Are Exposed to Fecal Contamination via Multiple Interconnected Pathways: A Network Model for Exposure Assessment

Authors: Yuke Wang, Christine L. Moe, Peter F. M. Teunis

Abstract: In recent decades, quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) has been widely used to assess exposure to fecal microbes and associated health risks. In this study, a multipathway exposure assessment model was developed to evaluate exposure to fecal microbes for children under 5 in highly contaminated urban environments. Children had contact with various environmental compartments. The contamination levels of these compartments were estimated from fecal indicator counts in the environmental samples. Structured observations of child behavior (including activities, locations, and time) were used to model behavioral sequences as a dynamic network. The exposure model combines behavior sequences with environmental contamination, using additional exposure factors when needed, to estimate the number of fecal microbes transferred from environmental sources to human oral ingestion. As fecal exposure in a highly contaminated urban environment consists of contributions from multiple pathways, it is imperative to study their relative importance. READ MORE

Urban sanitation coverage and environmental fecal contamination: Links between the household and public environments of Accra, Ghana

Authors: David M. Berendes, Amy E. Kirby, Julie A. Clennon, Chantal Agbemabiese, Joseph A. Ampofo, George E. Armah, Kelly K. Baker, Pengbo Liu, Heather E. Reese, Katharine A. Robb, Nii Wellington, Habib Yakubu, Christine L. Moe

Abstract: Exposure to fecal contamination in public areas, especially in dense, urban environments, may significantly contribute to enteric infection risk. This study examined associations between sanitation and fecal contamination in public environments in four low-income neighborhoods in Accra, Ghana. Soil (n = 72) and open drain (n = 90) samples were tested for E. coli, adenovirus, and norovirus. Sanitation facilities in surveyed households (n = 793) were categorized by onsite fecal sludge containment (“contained” vs. “uncontained”) using previous Joint Monitoring Program infrastructure guidelines. Most sanitation facilities were shared by multiple households. READ MORE